Plants vs. Meats

The Health, History, and Ethics of What We Eat

  • Interest Level: Grade 6 - Grade 12   ·  
  • Reading Level: Grade 8

No one can live without food, but what you eat is a personal decision. Today many people are examining nutritional advice and choosing to eat more vegetables and fruits and less meat. But is all meat bad for you? What does the science say?

People also make food choices for ethical and religious reasons. Some vegetarians and vegans avoid meat because they believe killing animals is wrong. Other people shun meat from factory farms. Recently, more people are seeking out foods grown locally and organically.

What do you choose to eat and why? This book will help you make decisions to support your values.

Format Your Price
978-1-4677-8011-7
$25.99
978-1-4677-9580-7
$38.99
Interest Level Grade 6 - Grade 12
Reading Level Grade 8
Genre Nonfiction, Young Adult
Category Science
Copyright 2016
Publisher Lerner Publishing Group
Imprint Twenty-First Century Books ™
Language English
Number of Pages 96
Publication Date 2016-01-01
Reading Counts! Level 12.9
Text Type Argument
BISACS YAN014000, YAN003010, YAN024020
Dewey 641.5'636
Graphics Full-color illustrations
Dimensions 7 x 9
Lexile 1250
Features Author/Illustrator biography, Bibliography/further reading, Glossary, Index, Reviewed, Sidebars, Source notes, Starred Reviews, and Table of contents

Reviews

Booklist

“Hughes offers a compact but comprehensive guide to food production and consumption in the U.S.. . . . [An] admirably balanced, bite-sized primer on ethical eating.”—starred, Booklist

School Library Journal

“[T]his is a timely, student-friendly primer on the historical, nutritional, and ethical impacts of what and how humans eat. . . . This solid introduction to where food comes from and the consequences of its consumption and production is a worthy addition.”—School Library Journal

Kirkus Reviews

“Hughes is careful not to paint black-and-white pictures of any stance on food or make strident arguments for eating one type of food over another. . . . Good food for thought that won’t leave readers feeling stuffed.”—Kirkus Reviews

Author: Meredith Sayles Hughes