A Story to Tell

Traditions of a Tlingit Community

From the Series We Are Still Here: Native Americans Today

  • Interest Level: Grade 3 - Grade 6   ·  
  • Reading Level: Grade 5

Frances Nannauck Kraus takes her eleven-year-old granddaughter, Marissa, to Kake, Alaska—the place of much of their family history. On one of their walks, they climb up a hill to the tallest totem poles in the world. On their way up the hill, Fran tells Marissa stories about some of the history and traditions of the Tlingit people. Marissa begins to have a better understanding of her heritage and learns the importance of sharing that knowledge with others—by telling her stories.

Format List Price Your Price Qty
978-0-76138-143-3
$31.99 $23.99
Interest Level Grade 3 - Grade 6
Reading Level Grade 5
Genre Nonfiction
Subject Social Studies
Publisher Lerner Publishing Group
Imprint Lerner Publications ™
Language English
Publication Date 2011-08-01
BISACS JNF052020, JNF007050, JNF018040
Dewey 979.8'004972
Graphics 1-color illustrations, Full-color illustrations
Guided Reading Level T
ATOS Reading Level 5.0
Accelerated Reader® Quiz 49525
Accelerated Reader® Points 1.0
Features Awards, Bibliography/further reading, Glossary, Maps, and Reviewed

Awards

  • NCSS/CBC Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People, Winner, 1998

Reviews

Christian Library Journal

“Grandmother Fran has a story to tell her granddaughter Marissa. A Story to Tell is that story. Grandmother Fran tells Marissa the story of the Tlingit people. Many aspects of Tlingit life are included in the story: their history, their culture, the clan structure, the influence of the whites. Marissa is the neice of the photographer. Ms. Kraus’ beautiful photos compliment the text. Author Richard Nichols has written a wonderful story of a grandmother passing on the tribal story to her granddaughter in the way elders in native tribes have passed on the stories for centuries. A Story to Tell is part of the We Are Still Here series.” —Christian Library Journal

MultiCultural Review

“This is a very personal story and it makes all the difference.” —MultiCultural Review

Photographer: Denise R. Kraus

Author: Richard Nichols