George Washington's Presidency

From the Series Presidential Powerhouses

  • Interest Level: Grade 6 - Grade 12   ·  
  • Reading Level: Grade 8

In 1789, when George Washington took office as the nation’s first president, the United States was an experiment that could easily fail. Only a few years earlier, the fledgling democracy had broken away from British rule. The thirteen states were vying for power and had only reluctantly accepted a strong central government. Whoever led that central government would face many challenges. Most Americans believed Washington was the right person for the job. He worked to revive the struggling economy, secure the nation’s borders, and gain the respect of other nations. And by inventing many of his duties and powers as he went along, he shaped the presidency into a strong and influential office.

Format List Price Your Price Qty
978-1-4677-7924-1
$35.99 $26.99
978-1-4677-8598-3
$53.32 $39.99
Interest Level Grade 6 - Grade 12
Reading Level Grade 8
Genre Nonfiction, Young Adult
Copyright 2016
Publisher Lerner Publishing Group
Imprint Lerner Publications ™
Language English
Number of Pages 104
Publication Date 2016-01-01
Reading Counts! Level 11.6
BISACS YAN025170, YAN052040, YAN006080
Dewey 973.4'1092
Dimensions 6 x 9
Lexile 1160
ATOS Reading Level 8.4
Accelerated Reader® Quiz 180916
Accelerated Reader® Points 3.0
Features Bibliography/further reading, Glossary, Index, Reviewed, Sidebars, Source notes, Table of contents, and Timeline

Reviews

School Library Journal, Series Made Simple

“[F]act-filled, well-written examinations. . . . The series handles weighty matters with an appropriately serious tone, while using accessible language that doesn’t patronize. . . . A worthy addition to student collections.”—School Library Journal, Series Made Simple

Author: Krystyna Poray Goddu

Krystyna Poray Goddu has been a writer and editor for more than thirty years; her books include Dollmakers and Their Stories: Women Who Changed the World of Play, and A Girl Called Vincent: A Biography of Poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, both middle-grade nonfiction. Her writing for children has also appeared in American Girl magazine. She reviews and writes about children’s books for Publishers Weekly and The New York Times Book Review. In addition to her writing and editing experience, she has worked in school libraries and taught writing to middle-school students in independent schools in New York City. She holds a degree in comparative literature from Brown University.